Cultural competence in nursing

This brings opportunities and challenges for nurses to deliver culturally competent services. Whether working at a hospital, in a nursing home, or within a school, nurses must have the ability to identify differences in others.

Cultural competence in nursing

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A Culturally Competent Nursing Care

Request information to learn more about this program and receive your free career guide. Request Info Cultural Competency in Nursing Practice Nursing practice is comparable to a puzzle, a multilayered culture of health care practice that modifies itself with every interaction.

Is nursing not a philosophy, a collection and sharing of values, beliefs, principles and dare I say its own language that guides all those who choose to identify with it? But just like any other culture that wants to survive and flourish comes the issue of preservation when it tries to exist in a society that is not familiar with its customs.

In this current climate of globalization, it is not ideal to separate from what is familiar and assimilate in order to thrive.

There needs to be Cultural competence in nursing balance. Nursing practice does not and should not have the luxury of segregation in order to preserve its values but instead integrate and collaborate when it comes to providing quality health care to multicultural societies. In a recent blog, I explored the evolution of nursing and an ethical principle of advocacy.

In order to effectively advocate for an individual and promote health and prevention activities, a nurse must first consider the characteristics of the individual or group. However, despite the many changes that health care has implemented health disparities continue to exist and in some areas have worsened.

Consider what is happening in the world and particularly here in the United States U. It is not necessary or seen as beneficial for immigrants to assimilate to their host country; rather many families can make a conscience decision to integrate and preserve their cultural health practices and customs.

However, with that shift from assimilation to integration, we must now consider globalization and cultural competency as yet another vital layer to this puzzle of nursing practice. Multicultural societies pose many challenges to the achievement of health equity due to the variety of health care needs and languages.

Health care professionals need to pay close attention to diverse groups of individuals as they are at greatest risk for health disparities.

Diverse groups may face discriminationhave fewer resources, and may lack the accessibility and understanding of available health care resources. Health services for multicultural societies are greatly underutilized due to cultural and linguistic barriers.

This is where the notion of culturally competent nursing care will prove to be the most beneficial when caring for diverse groups of individuals.

There are many factors that a nurse must consider in order to deliver culturally competent care. Nurses should evaluate their own biases, beliefs, and values prior to working with any group of individuals.

Consider your existing stereotypes and myths of particular groups so that it will assist to achieve your goals of health promotion and not impede them.

Cultural competence is not any easy feat; rather it is an ongoing learning process. By understanding how you identify and how this self-awareness impacts your nursing care abilities, only then will you develop the respect and skills necessary to reduce the inequities that exist in health care.

How to Strengthen Cultural Competence in Nursing Practice

Culturally competent care is not just acquiring information on a particular group of people but rather developing a respect for and understanding that the beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, language, and rituals of that group all play a role.

For example, it can be integral to the healing process if it is understood that a curandero can aid in medication regime adherence for a patient of Latin decent. In addition to this knowledge and respect, effective communication and collaboration between the nurse and other health care professionals involved and that specific population will persist if it includes information and services in that language and at the literacy level of that population.

All of these components encompass the concept of cultural competence and without it; strategies to promote health and decreasing health inequities among diverse populations are futile.Cultural competence is a lifelong learning process that is highly dynamic.

Over-generalization and stereotyping can be prevented by gaining a deeper understanding of processes involved in the assessment of cultural patterns and factors that determine group and individual differences. Cultural competence is defined as the ability of providers and organizations to effectively deliver health care services that meet the social, cultural, and linguistic needs of patients.1 A culturally competent health care system can help improve health outcomes and quality of care, and can contribute to the elimination of racial and ethnic.

The fourth component, cultural encounter, is defined as the process that encourages nurses to directly engage in cross-cultural interactions with patients from culturally diverse backgrounds. 9 Directly interacting with patients from different cultural backgrounds helps nurses increase their cultural competence.

Cultural competence is a term that has been saturated in the news, in journals, and in the learning arena.

Cultural competence in nursing

But how does a nurse become culturally competent? Culturally competent care includes knowledge, attitudes, and skills that support caring for people across different languages and cultures.

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Cultural competence in nursing

The fourth component, cultural encounter, is defined as the process that encourages nurses to directly engage in cross-cultural interactions with patients from culturally diverse backgrounds.

9 Directly interacting with patients from different cultural backgrounds helps . Cultural competence is not any easy feat; rather it is an ongoing learning process. By understanding how you identify and how this self-awareness impacts your nursing care abilities, only then will you develop the respect and skills necessary to reduce the inequities that exist in health care.

Culturally Competent Nursing Care